CONSERVATION Congress

 

The Conservation Congress provides a voice for native wildlife in northern California.

We speak for the rights of Northern Spotted Owl, Pacific Fisher, Northern Goshawk,

American Marten, Gray Wolf, and other unrepresented wildlife

that rely on landscape-scale habitat protection.

Protecting National Forest Lands

Saving forests and species in Northern California

American Marten

American Marten

American Marten: Pine martens are agile climbers and spend much of their time in trees, where they prey on squirrels and chipmunks. They are a member of the weasel family. An American marten group is called a 'richness'. During cold weather, martens have a hard time keeping warm, so they tunnel deep under the snow into tangles of tree roots for warmth. Threatened by logging of old growth forests.

Northern Spotted Owl

Northern Spotted Owl

The Spotted Owl is closely tied to old-growth forests for nesting sites. The most important food items for the Spotted Owl are flying squirrels and woodrats. Spotted Owls are one of the few owls that have dark colored eyes. Most owls have yellow to red-orange eyes. A Spotted Owl may live to be 17 years old. Spotted owls don’t migrate for the winter. Threatened by logging of old growth forests.

Marbled Murrelet

Marbled Murrelet

A small seabird in the auk family was once known as the "Australian Bumble Bee" by fishermen and as the "fogbird" or "fog lark" by loggers. Though it was first described in 1789, a nest site wasn't discovered until 1961 by ornithologists in Asia; a North American nest was not found until 1974. A group of auks has many collective nouns, including a "colony", "loomery", and "raft" of auks. Threatened by logging of old growth forests.

Pacific Fisher

Pacific Fisher

Did you know? Fishers are native to North America. They hiss and growl when upset. They can live about ten years in the wild. They are closely related to badgers, mink and otters. Fishers like to catch and eat porcupines. The young are known as "kits". Threatened by logging of old growth forests.

Northern Goshawk

Northern Goshawk

The northern goshawk is the largest of the North American "true hawks". The name “”goshawk”” is a traditional name from Anglo-Saxon gōshafoc, literally “”goose hawk””. The name implies prowess against larger quarry such as geese, but Northern Goshawks were also flown against crane species and other large water birds in ancient falconry. Atilla the Hun wore an image of a Northern Goshawk on his helmet. Threatened by logging of old growth forests.

Great Grey Owl

Great Grey Owl

One of the largest owls in the world, it is infamously known as the 'Phantom of the North' and is also known as the Lapland Owl, Spectral Owl, Bearded Owl, and Sooty Owl. Did You Know? Errol, the old owl that served the Weasley family in the Harry Potter series, was a Great Gray Owl. Threatened by logging of forest habitat.

Site design © 2015-2023

SassymediaDESIGN.COM

Northern Spotted Owl

The Spotted Owl is closely tied to old-growth forests for nesting sites. The most important food items for the Spotted Owl are flying squirrels and woodrats. Spotted Owls are one of the few owls that have dark colored eyes. Most owls have yellow to red-orange eyes. A Spotted Owl may live to be 17 years old. Spotted owls don’t migrate for the winter. Threatened by logging of old growth forests.